About Elderberry Wisdom Farm

Our Native America nonprofit corporation, Elderberry Wisdom Farm, was created to assist Native Americans as they integrate academics, experiential service learning activities and cultural and ecological knowledge while creating their own agricultural and horticultural career pathways.

Our 501(c)(3) nonprofit is currently accomplishing three initiatives. The TEK and Habitat Restoration Workforce Development Project; Chemawa Journey of Transformation and the Martin High Bear biography. More information is available on our Projects page at this website.

 

Our TEK and Habitat Restoration Workforce Development Project is providing a culturally-tailored learning model designed to train and mentor Native Americans of all ages who are pursuing agricultural and horticultural careers.

 

This career pathway planning initiative will open the door for Native Americans, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders to a wide range of option.  We are promoting opportunities for them to enter the environmental restoration economy, especially including horticultural and agricultural microenterprise businesses that become part of our future intentional farm coop community of Native American farmers and horticulturalists. Our experiential service learning is expanding opportunities for Interns to complete habitat restoration and other careers with conservation groups, government agencies, local native plant nurseries, and farms. Some of our interns are also pursuing advanced degrees in higher education.

Diverse collaborative partners have agreed to support our efforts to assist younger generations of emerging Native American leaders and role models who are committed to help accomplish environmental restoration in their sacred landscapes. This has helped us to successfully integrate traditional knowledge and experiential learning opportunities with western science academics. These partnerships are expanding throughout 2022 as we formalize our relationships.

Elderberry Wisdom Farm is also committed to Native American health and wellness resiliency. By reconnecting project participants to their Oldest Grandmother, our Earth Mother, our cohorts of Native interns are being gifted with healing. No matter where we are from, no matter what our color, ethnicity, or age, she is still our Grandmother Earth. She provides the peace and tranquility that can only come from the gift of spiritual connection with Creator and their diverse ancestry.

We are especially committed to raising public awareness of Native Americans' prophetic role of helping all peoples learn to care for the earth and for one another with respect and honor. Therefore, plans include providing public audiences with multimedia programming and public cultural events to strengthen awareness and understanding of the cultural heritage and traditional knowledge of Native American elders, cultural leaders and indigenous scientists. Because of our commitment to race reconciliation, we are creating a strategic communications plan that will help increasingly inclusive communities to strengthen their appreciation and respect for the wisdom and knowledge of Native American wisdom keepers.

Much service learning work has occurred at Blue Elderberry Farm which is located in rural south Marion County, Oregon. It began with our two-acre farm and has evolved into a 19.7-acre property with a recent purchase of SA (Special Agriculture) land north of our farm. As the land is restored, interns will be able to expand the new 350-foot pollinator hedgerow and Blue Elderberry patch, plus the 24’ x 48’ multi-purpose semi-gable greenhouse which includes inside and outside raised beds.

 

In 2022, we will also develop the 11-acre organic farm property which has been offered to us on a long-term lease by a generous colleague. Because of the rich Woodburn silt soil and irrigation already established, we will be able to train emerging Native American farmers to develop their own farming microenterprises. We will seek land for a public housing project in 2023 where our farmers and horticulturalists can form an intentional coop community and live in an environment where our Native American cultural values and spiritual qualities can prevail.


Information about our newest project, the Chemawa Journey of Transformation, will be published in future editions of our newsletter through 2022. We have worked for over a decade to cultivate the collaborative relationships and funding to support our youth, especially vulnerable Native American high school students at Chemawa Indian School. This five-year research project is being coordinated by the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute at University of Washington and is funded by National Institute for Mental Health at National Institute for Health. Monthly updates on this project will also be published on the Projects page. Position descriptions will be published on our Jobs page and promoted on our social media pages.

 

The Seven Commandments of the Sacred Buffalo Calf Maiden:  Martin High Bear (1919-1995) The High Bear biography was given to Elderberry Wisdom’s Founder Rose High Bear as a personal project by the Spirit World in 1988. In order to accomplish this challenge and raise her awareness of the special culture and history of her late husband’s heritage, she conducted two oral history recording projects in 1999 and 2000 and again in 2004 and 2005. She has since researched the biography in preparation for completion and publishing. Updates will be provided in our newsletters and on our Projects page through 2022.

 

For more information about any of our initiatives and receive monthly updates, you are welcome to sign up for our monthly e-newsletter at the home page of our website.  You can also feel free to leave inquiries and comments on our Contact Us page.